Posted in Creation, Curation, Investigation

Consumption to Curation to Creation

Consumption to Curation to Creation – That One Thing
That One Thing, that one thing you do. That was the theme of our digital professional learning program this year. How did you integrate digital tools into your practice this year? What was that one thing you could do with any of our digital resources to facilitate students investigating authentic problems or situations, creating innovative products, demonstrating what they know and are able to do, collaborating inside and out of the classroom, communicating in real time, or even steamlining your workflow? What was that one thing for you? Where do you find yourself in the process of technology integration?

It’s a normal part of the technology integration process to begin with using your digital resources for consumption. It’s convenient. We have a tool right in our hands, the iPad, and we don’t have to wait to logon: email, reading, research at the tip of our fingers. This is an important part of the adoption process, because it gives us the opportunity to become more proficient with the device.

What’s next? Curating materials is the next step. Curating is the process of gathering materials and resources and sifting through them to find the most meaningful ones and incorporate them in an organized manner. Our filing cabinets are physical representations of this concept. Having a digital tool at our fingertips opens the door to an unimaginable world of resources that would burst that filing cabinet. Explore what’s out there!

There comes a time when we need to create our own materials for instruction. Again, our filing cabinets are filled with examples of content that we have created over time to meet our instructional needs. Our digital tools offer the opportunity to innovate what those resources look like. Sometimes it takes just a bit of inspiration to see the possibilities. Where do we find that inspiration? We find that by observing our peers and collaborating with them. We find that by exploring what other educators are sharing with us online.

This really isn’t a linear path into digital teaching and learning. I see this as a circular process of consuming, curating, creating and back to consuming. This is a constructive practice woven in and throughout the Technology Integration Matrix and the SAMR model of technology integration. When we move from our entry into technology integration to adoption, adaptation, and transformation, we revisit the stages of consumption, curation and creation as we refine our art and practice.

Where were you this year regarding your content and use of materials? What was That One Thing you did this year? Next week will bring a look at the Technology Integration Matrix and reflect on where we are in the Matrix.

Resources

  • “Matrix.” TIM, Florida Center for Instructional Technology, fcit.usf.edu/matrix/matrix/. Accessed 30 Apr. 2017.
  • Reich, Justin. “Three Lessons from the History of Education Technology.” Education Week –EdTech Researcher, Education Week, 15 Sept. 2014, blogs.edweek.org/edweek/edtechresearcher/2014/09/three_lessons_from_the_history_of_education_technology.html?r=641074646. Accessed 30 Apr. 2017.
  • Reich, Justin. “Towards a Pedagogy for Tablets: From Consumption to Curation and Creation.” Education Week – EdTech Researcher, Education Week, 25 Sept. 2014, blogs.edweek.org/edweek/edtechresearcher/2014/09/towards_a_pedagogy_for_tablets_from_consumption_to_curation_and_creation.html. Accessed 30 Apr. 2017.
  • Schrock, Kathy. “SAMR.” Kathy Schrock’s Guide to Everything, http://www.schrockguide.net/samr.html. Accessed 30 Apr. 2017.

Author:

Over the last 20 years I have taught German to elementary, middle, and high school students as well as adults. I have been a classroom teacher, department chair, trainer and presenter as well as having a published curriculum. I served on the State Board for World Language Education as well as the Board of a local charity. During this time I have continuously looked for ways to incorporate technology into the classroom as a seamless tool furthering learning goals.

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